Asian style furo

Duration: 12min 44sec Views: 1936 Submitted: 17.04.2020
Category: Fisting
Tubs are traditionally made of Hinoki - used for centuries to build Shinto temples. Its American cousin is Port Orford Cedar, and both woods are prized for their antiseptic properties — sushi chefs use them for chopping boards. Both also release a wonderful lemon ginger scent in a cloud of relaxing steam as the tub fills. Hinoki oil is a staple of aromatherapy and some people say it helps congestion and asthma. Other popular woods are sweet-smelling Alaskan Yellow Cedar and Western Red Cedar, as well as sustainably-harvested teak, a dark wood with a neutral scent. This owner created an enclosed garden to enjoy his soaking tub, enhancing the feel of a private sanctuary by carefully placing a mirror that reflects a lantern and path.

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Some of us are shower people, and some are bathers. But there's a way to be both, as the Japanese discovered centuries ago when they developed the ofuro, or soaking tub. Traditionally, the Japanese get clean with a shower or hand bath and then step into an "ofuro," a deep tub full of clean hot water. These tubs are often large enough that several family members can have a communal soak. It's considered a relaxing and important ritual.
Specifically it is a type of bath which originated as a short, steep-sided wooden bathtub. Baths of this type are found all over Japan in houses, apartments and traditional Japanese inns ryokan but are now usually made out of a plastic or stainless steel. A furo differs from a conventional Western bathtub by being of a deeper construction, typically in the region of 0.