Doctor sex with patients

Duration: 5min 23sec Views: 1602 Submitted: 26.05.2020
Category: Fisting
Male patients who identified as gay or bisexual were more likely to have discussions with their clinicians about sex compared with patients who identified as straight, a researcher reported. Healthcare providers asked a higher proportion of patients who identified as bisexual or homosexual, compared with those who identified as heterosexual, about how many sexual partners they had, about sexual orientation and activity, and about condom use, reported Jenna Reich, a medical student at NYU Grossman School of Medicine in New York City, and colleagues. Patients who were homosexual were also more likely to be tested, diagnosed, or treated for a sexually transmitted infection STI within the last year, Reich said in a presentation at the Sexual Medicine Society of North America virtual meeting. Amy Pearlman, MD, of the University of Iowa Healthcare in Iowa City, who was not involved with the study, told MedPage Today that while it's interesting to see that people who identify as gay or homosexual are asked more about sex, she was not surprised. We as providers have to feel more comfortable asking about sexual health," she said. Pearlman added that clinicians' discussions with patients about sex should not be limited only to questions about whether patients are sexually active.

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Simon asked her to lunch because he needed a shoulder to cry on. His girlfriend, who was diagnosed with a brain tumour some time ago, had recently died. During lunch, she told Simon that she had just ended a relationship and joined a dating service. Quit the dating agency, Simon told her, and go out with me instead. She was taken aback — gobsmacked, really. Here she was, expecting to console someone in grief, and was instead faced with an ill-timed romantic proposal.

Doctor admits trading opioid prescriptions for sex with patients, feds say

A New York City doctor admitted Wednesday to doling out opioid pills to patients in exchange for sexual favors, federal authorities in New Jersey announced. Joseph Santiamo , 65, of Staten Island, pleaded guilty during a video conference hearing to conspiracy to distribute oxycodone. Santiamo owned and operated a Staten Island-based internal medicine and geriatric care practice from Jan.
E ditor —In his personal view Barrett shared the sadly far too common scenario of a patient's sexual needs being overlooked and unfairly judged. Yet staff in primary and secondary care are not adequately trained in issues surrounding sexual intercourse, particularly interpersonal relationships, awareness, and respect of sexual difference. They also lack the confidence to communicate comfortably on sensitive topics. Unsurprisingly they either avoid discussion of the issue or do not handle it well.